Junior Ganymede
We endeavor to give satisfaction

In Praise of Freshly Ground Flour

February 24th, 2017 by Bookslinger

We’ve long heard that whole wheat flour (with bran and germ) is more nutritious than white flour that has had the bran and germ removed.  

I’ve recently been grinding some wheat kernals, that I had in my food storage, into flour.  I’ve done both red winter wheat and white spring wheat, and learned a new thing.  Fresh ground flour has oil in it. The whole wheat flour that you buy at the grocery store has sat around long enough for the “volitiles” (oil, etc.) to have evaporated.   Fresh ground flour also has more flavor.  (more…)

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February 24th, 2017 15:45:17

Lose Things Faster

February 24th, 2017 by G.

The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.
Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.
Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.
-thus Elizabeth Bishop
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February 24th, 2017 06:58:27

Look Who’s Back – Movie recommendation

February 23rd, 2017 by Bruce Charlton

An English language version of Er ist wieder da/ Look who’s back, with its above brilliant and striking cover art, caught my attention in a bookshop a couple of years ago – and I bought it on the basis that it has been a sensational best-seller in Germany.

(I have a considerable interest in German culture and literature, and my brother and my wife’s brother both have German wives.)

The premise is that somehow Hitler is time-shifted to modern Germany, just as he was when he died, and has to make sense of it all. And Germany also has to make sense of him – which they do by assuming he is some kind of satirical comedian who never drops his impersonation.

It was quite intriguing, but I didn’t manage to get through much of the book. However I was interested enough to give the subtitled movie a try – when I discovered it was available on Netflix. The movie had been as successful in Germany as the book – being number one box office for a while.

I would highly recommend Look who’s back as extremely thought-provoking and also at times very funny (Hitler’s encounters with daytime TV, the internet, as a chat show guest etc.) – despite that it is overlong and sags in several points (the improvised sections – which I mostly skipped).

But the scripted sections of the movie were fascinating. The tone shifts back and forth between sympathetic and horrified, between making clear Hitler’s broad, powerful democratic appeal and personal charisma; and the terrible, disgusting quality of his doctrines and actions. I found myself as if caught by a hook, pulled back and forth, but unable to squirm free.

The result was, I found, a very complex argument which has stayed in my mind for several days – indeed, there haven’t been many recent movies which I found so interesting.

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February 23rd, 2017 13:03:34

Something Something Ajax

February 23rd, 2017 by G.

When you’re an Assyrian-bearded manly man like me, you can just about summon up enough courage to read a romance novel. (more…)

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February 23rd, 2017 09:16:39

Whence Pepe?

February 23rd, 2017 by MC

Image result for contemplative pepe

[Google Images result for “Contemplative Pepe”]

I have a theory about the rise of the Alt Right. Or maybe that’s too specific: I have a theory about why the American Right has become considerably more verbally aggressive, politically incorrect, and nationalistic over the last 2-4 years, a phenomenon that encompasses Trump and Trumpism, the Alt Right, the rise of Breitbart and Steve Bannon, etc. (more…)

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February 23rd, 2017 02:12:54

Agency is Awesome

February 22nd, 2017 by G.

Image result for painting a wall

If you’ve ever taken on some small project–going to the temple, ticking off a list of chores, reducing your food budget for the month– and seen it through despite friction and your own fatigue, one thing will be obvious: agency is awesome.  It feels great to set your mind to something and then do it. (more…)

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February 22nd, 2017 08:18:42

Real Christianity is Contagious

February 21st, 2017 by G.

The way that can be said is not the true way.

Neal A. Maxwell is a mine.  Every sentence is a sermon.  (more…)

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February 21st, 2017 08:30:35

Free ebook: Thomas Merton – A Life Inspired.

February 20th, 2017 by Bookslinger

Free for a day or so at Amazon.  By Wyatt North.  I haven’t read it yet, but just wanted to alert others. (more…)

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February 20th, 2017 11:45:23

Submission

February 20th, 2017 by G.

I ran across a conference talk from 2015 yesterday, from an African general authority.  Be Fruitful, Multiply, and Subdue the Earth. Excellent talk.  But what caught my eye was the shameless un-PC of the title.

Of course, the scriptures make no effort to be PC, and Africans very little.  (more…)

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February 20th, 2017 07:35:58

Too Young to Work

February 20th, 2017 by G.

On the sweetness of Mormon life. (more…)

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February 20th, 2017 07:21:18

Worlds without Number

February 17th, 2017 by Zen

Now, lest we spend all our time on pessimism and trouble, (ahem, a recent lesson in church), I would like to share this:

It is fascinating enough for us to image exoplanets. But here is an example of exoplanets, imaged moving in their orbits.

Further images of other worlds.

And some Hugh Nibley lecturing on Cosmology and the plurality of worlds (I, II) in the Scriptures and ancient literature. The entire series is worth listening to.

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February 17th, 2017 21:43:17

Rome Burns and we are all holding Flamethrowers

February 17th, 2017 by Zen

At least Nero only fiddled.

(more…)

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February 17th, 2017 21:18:27

The Internet of Things

February 16th, 2017 by G.

“I say, Jeeves,” I said, bounding into the room.  “I have a perfectly fruity idea.  A fellow at the Drones was telling me all about the internet of things.  It’s ripping.  We install it here at the flat and when you go off to do your annual shrimping down at thingummy beach, why, its almost like I will be having an cyber-valet.”

Jeeves did not skip gaily about the room.  He was not exactly gruntled.  If he did not technically give me the nolle prosequi, he came near as toucher.

“I venture to suggest, sir,” he said, “that you may be laboring under an misapprehension.”  As he explained it, the dashed internet of  things did not absolutely mix you a stiff brandy-and-s when it saw you drag in rather down in the dumpsish.  It seems the jolly ol’ setup is rather more in the wheelhouse of ordering you laundry detergent if it overhears you talking about Soapy Sid, or conveying your private conversations to fellows in the Punjab so they can better tailor advertisements to the tastes of Sahib.  Not to mention the hacker chappies, who sound rather like blighters.

“Jeeves,” I said magnanimously, raising my hand, “say no more about it.  If it not absolutely awsomesauce, I will forswear it.  Take it away and give it to the deserving poor.”

 

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February 16th, 2017 15:40:46

Superstition

February 15th, 2017 by Patrick Henry

Romans were notoriously superstitious.  They sought for auguries and omens.  By our lights, the result should have been poverty and failure.  On the contrary–they rolled. (more…)

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February 15th, 2017 22:14:40

Elites without Kids

February 15th, 2017 by Patrick Henry

File:Taiwan-population-pyramid-2014.svg - Wikipedia

 

That is a population pyramid.  I picked it randomly.  There are lots of places that look the same.  Spain and Slovenia and Singapore and China and lots of places here in America. (more…)

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February 15th, 2017 07:45:16